Max Richter (b. 22nd March, 1966)

From Wikipedia: “Max Richter is a German-born British composer. He works within postminimalism and in the meeting of contemporary classical and alternative popular musical styles. Richter is classically trained, having graduated in composition from the Royal Academy of Music, and studied with Luciano Berio in Italy. Richter also composes music for stage, opera, ballet and […]

gramophone.co.uk announced today: “Max Richter to release new album, ‘VOICES’, featuring hundreds of voices in more than 70 languages.

The album, 10 years in the making, is a setting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and is released alongside a new SLEEP app

Max Richter’s new album, ‘VOICES’, will be released on July 30 by Decca Records and is a celebration of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights featuring hundreds of crowd-sourced recordings of people around the world reading the Declaration in more than 70 languages. The voice of Eleanor Roosevelt recorded in 1949 can be heard in the first single from the album, ‘All Human Beings’, which has been released today.”

From Wikipedia:

“Max Richter is a German-born British composer. He works within postminimalism and in the meeting of contemporary classical and alternative popular musical styles. Richter is classically trained, having graduated in composition from the Royal Academy of Music, and studied with Luciano Berio in Italy.

Richter also composes music for stage, opera, ballet and screen. He has also collaborated with other musicians, as well as with performance, installation and media artists. He has recorded eight solo albums and his music is widely used in cinema…He rose to prominence with his score to Ari Folman’s Golden Globe-winning film Waltz with Bashir in 2007.” (…just a year before he provided the score for Studio aka’s Lost and Found…)

In 2017, Dr Pamela Jacobsen, a NIHR Clinical Doctoral Fellow at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, wrote for the psychologist (British Psychological Society):

“…You are not ordinarily actively encouraged to fall asleep during a concert. You are also not ordinarily encouraged to come ready-dressed in pyjamas, toting sleeping-bag and pillow. But then Max Richter’s Sleep is no ordinary composition. An overnight performance from the Wellcome Collection in 2015 broke records as the longest single continuous piece of music ever broadcast live on the BBC. Richter, a prolific and award-winning contemporary composer, described Sleep as a ‘lullaby for a frenetic world’. He consulted with neuroscientist David Eagleman in its conception; Richter was fascinated in what we know about sleep, its processes, purpose and structure. Sleep is perhaps the ultimate enigma – we know we have to sleep, but we still don’t really know why…

…The Barbican were in charge of the production for Sleep, and had found a wonderful venue in the grand hall of the former fish market at Old Billingsgate by the River Thames. I arrived excited but oddly apprehensive. I consider myself lucky in that I’m generally a good sleeper. However, like most people my sleep is very sensitive to my emotional state, and I often don’t sleep well if I’m stressed or upset about something. What if I didn’t manage to sleep at all? What if a miserable night of self-inflicted insomnia might follow? As so often is the case, my night-time fears were unfounded. The production team had obviously put a great deal of thought into the arrangement of the camp beds, the temperature of the large hall, the soft purple lighting. I settled down comfortably with sleeping bag and pillow. I did wake several times in the night; but only briefly, gently drifting up and down through layers of consciousness. I woke in the morning with a sense of ease, as if the music had cocooned me safely all night. I was left thinking that Richter’s masterpiece is more than a lullaby; it’s also a love song, to that most soothing of all balms – a good night’s sleep.”

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