“To face unafraid/The plans that we’ve made”

This post’s title is taken from “Winter Wonderland”, a song written in 1934 by Felix Bernard and lyricist Richard Bernhard Smith. Smith, a native of Honesdale, Pennsylvania, was reportedly inspired to write the lyrics after seeing Honesdale’s Central Park covered in snow. Smith wrote the lyrics while being treated for tuberculosis in the West Mountain Sanitarium in Scranton. (Wikipedia)

It was one of those cases where you approve the broad, general principle of an idea but can’t help being in a bit of a twitter at the prospect of putting it into practical effect. I explained this to Jeeves, and he said much the same thing had bothered Hamlet.”

(from Jeeves in the Morning (1946).)

Joy in the Morning is a novel by English humorist P.G. Wodehouse, first published in the United States on 22 August 1946, by Doubleday & Co., New York, and in the United Kingdom on 2 June 1947, by Herbert Jenkins, London. Some later American paperback editions bore the title Jeeves in the Morning.

The title derives from an English translation of Psalms 30:5:

“Weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning.”

Wodehouse again:

The Right Hon. was a tubby little chap who looked like he had been poured into his clothes and had forgotten to say ‘When.’”

(from Carry On, Jeeves)

Carry On, Jeeves is a collection of ten short stories by P. G. Wodehouse. It was first published in the United Kingdom on 9 October 1925 by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States on 7 October 1927 by George H. Doran, New York. Many of the stories had previously appeared in the Saturday Evening Post, and some were rewritten versions of stories in the collection My Man Jeeves (1919).

From The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge (1910), by Rainer Maria Rilke:

“At that time, she was exceptionally sturdy of build, of a soft and buxom languor that seemed to have been negligently poured, as it were, into her loose, light-coloured dresses; her movements were weary and vague, and her eyes were forever watering.”

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