The Jameson Raid (29 December 1895 – 2 January 1896)

Image: (Wikipedia): “Rhodes Memorial on Devil’s Peak in Cape Town, South Africa, is a memorial to English-born, South African politician Cecil John Rhodes (1853–1902). The memorial was designed by the renowned architect, Sir Herbert Baker.

It consists of a massive staircase with 49 steps (one for each year of Rhodes’s life) leading from a semi-circular terrace up to a rectangular U-shaped monument formed of pillars. The memorial is built of Cape granite quarried on Table Mountain.

At the bottom of the steps is a bronze statue of a horseman, “Physical Energy”, by George Frederic Watts.”

From: Rosebery – Statesman in Turmoil (2005), by Leo McKinstry:

“On 29 December 1895 Dr Leander Starr Jameson led a motley band of adventurers on an invasion of the Boer republic of the Transvaal…Jameson’s Raid was a reckless, hopeless fiasco characterised by incompetence, amateurism, and wishful thinking…

It quickly emerged that Jameson, a Scottish-born doctor, soldier, and colonial politician, had not been acting on his own. The real master-mind was Cecil Rhodes, the ruthless and romantic millionaire Prime Minister of the Cape Colony…

Unsurprisingly, given the similarity of their political outlook, Rosebery was the statesman Rhodes most admired…on a visit to England in May 1899 Rhodes offered Rosebery the extraordinary sum of £50,000 to fight a national political campaign on an imperial platform; Rosebery, who had lost none of his hatred for anything that might compromise his independence, turned it down. The affinity that prompted Rhodes’s generosity in 1899 had also given rise four years earlier to allegations that Rosebery was complicit in the Jameson Raid.

In Britain, news of the failed coup was greeted initially with incredulity and anger, a mood that soon changed to jingoistic support for Jameson when the public learnt of the telegram sent by the German Kaiser to (President) Kruger congratulating him on foiling the Raid…”

https://youtu.be/AYe2lqQcues

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