World music

From Wikipedia:

“The term “world music” has been credited to ethnomusicologist Robert E. Brown, who coined it in the early 1960s at Wesleyan University in Connecticut, where he developed undergraduate through doctoral programs in the discipline. To enhance the learning process (John Hill), he invited more than a dozen visiting performers from Africa and Asia and began a world music concert series. The term became current in the 1980s as a marketing/classificatory device in the media and the music industry. There are several conflicting definitions for world music. One is that it consists of “all the music in the world”, though such a broad definition renders the term virtually meaningless.

Although it primarily describes traditional music, the world music category also includes popular music from non-Western urban communities (e.g. South African “township” music) and non-European music forms that have been influenced by other so-called third-world musics (e.g. Afro-Cuban music).
The inspiration of Zimbabwe’s Thomas Mapfumo in blending the Mbira (finger Piano) style onto the electric guitar, saw a host of other Zimbabwean musicians refining the genre, none more successfully than The Bhundu Boys. The Bhundu Jit music hit Europe with some force in 1986, taking Andy Kershaw and John Peel fully under its spell.
For many years, Paris has attracted numerous musicians from former colonies in West and North Africa. This scene is aided by the fact that there are many concerts and institutions that help to promote the music.
Algerian and Moroccan music have an important presence in the French capital. Hundreds of thousands of Algerian and Moroccan immigrants have settled in Paris, bringing the sounds of Amazigh (Berber), raï, and Gnawa music.
The West African music community is also very large, integrated by people from Senegal, Mali, Ivory Coast, and Guinea.
Unlike musical styles from other regions of the globe, the American music industry tends to categorize Latin music as its own genre and defines it as any music sung in Spanish from the Spanish-speaking world.”

“The Soweto Gospel Choir is a South African gospel group.

The Soweto Gospel Choir was formed in Soweto, South Africa, by David Mulovhedzi and Beverly Bryer, and producers Andrew Kay, David Vigo and Cliff Hocking in 2002. The more than 30-member ensemble blends elements of African gospel, African-American spirituals, reggae and American popular music. The group performed at the first of the 46664 concerts for Nelson Mandela and has since toured internationally several times.
Their albums Blessed, African Spirit and Freedom won the Grammy Award for Best Traditional World Music Album in 2006, 2007 and 2018, respectively.
On 7 July 2007 they performed at the South African leg of Live Earth. Also in 2007, they joined Robert Plant in contributing to Goin’ Home: A Tribute to Fats Domino (Vanguard Records), performing their version of Domino’s “Valley of Tears”.
The group was featured on the Peter Gabriel/Thomas Newman song “Down to Earth”, written for Pixar’s 2008 feature film WALL-E. The song was nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song at the 66th Golden Globe Awards and the Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 81st Academy Awards.
The group performed at the 2010 FIFA World Cup final draw on 4 December 2009 in Cape Town, South Africa.
In 2010, composer Christopher Tin’s song “Baba Yetu”, which featured the group, won the Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s). The song had originally been produced for Firaxis Games’s 2005 videogame Civilization IV, but Tin enlisted the Soweto Gospel Choir to re-record the song for inclusion on his debut album, Calling All Dawns, leading to the song’s nomination and award. This marked the first time a video game composition had won or been nominated for the category.
The group collaborates with American publishing company MusicSpoke to publish transcriptions of a number of its pieces, including “Balm of Gilead,” “Hloholonofatsa,” “Ke Na Le Modisa,” “Khumbaya,” “Shosholoza,” “Somlandela,” and “Swing Down Sweet Chariot.” “.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: