*The Ballad of Peckham Rye

*1960 novel by Muriel Spark

From familypedia.wikia.org:

“Peckham has never been an administrative district, or a single ecclesiastical parish in its own right, but it developed a strong sense of identity in the 19th century when Rye Lane was one of the most important shopping streets in South London. The area is identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London.

…The late 19th century also saw the arrival of George Batty, a manufacturer of condiments, whose main business stood at Finsbury Pavement. The company’s Peckham premises occupied 19 railway arches. It was acquired by the H. J. Heinz Company in 1905 as their first UK manufacturing base.

The southern end of Peckham was the location for the railway line that once served The Crystal Palace in Sydenham. Though the line was eventually dismantled due to the collapse of the embankment into the gardens of Marmora Road it is still possible to see large sections of it. The flats on Wood Vale and the full length of Brenchley Gardens trace its route.

Marmora, Therapia, Mundania and Scutari Roads, built in the 1880s, all derive their curious names from locations now in modern day Turkey, possibly from associations with the stationing of British forces there during the Crimean War…

(Wikipedia): “Tarabya (Ottoman Turkish: Tarabiye‎, Greek: Θεραπειά, romanized: Therapiá) is a neighbourhood in the Sarıyer district of Istanbul, Turkey. It is located on the European shoreline of the Bosphorus strait, between the neighbourhoods of Yeniköy and Kireçburnu. It was the site of the ancient town of Pharmakia.
In the early days of the last siege of Constantinople in 1453, Ottoman forces captured Therapia – then a minor Byzantine fortification.
Tarabya was where the foreign embassies had their summer houses during the Ottoman period, and today the area has several European consulates.
Sultan Selim II used to enjoy eating fish in this area and asked his grand vizier, Sokollu Mehmed Pasha, to build a palace for him where he can spend the summers. It is believed that Sultan Selim II called his palace Tarabiye which means “pleasure”, and the name of the neighbourhood (Tarabya) has derived from the name of this palace.
Besides its historical monuments, Tarabya is famous for its seafood restaurants, bistros and nightclubs.

…Close by is the Aquarias Golf Club, which is located over the cavernous Honor Oak Reservoir constructed between 1901 and 1909. When it was completed it was the largest brick built underground reservoir in the world and is still one of the largest in Europe. The reservoir now forms part of the Southern extension of the Thames Water Ring Main.

Camberwell Old Cemetery, on Forest Hill Road, is a later example of the ring of Victorian cemeteries that were built to alleviate the overcrowding of churchyards that was experienced with the rapid expansion of London in the 19th century. The Stone House at its main entrance was used in the filming of Joe Orton’s Entertaining Mr. Sloane (released 1970). It was gutted by fire in the mid-1970s and rebuilt some years later. Camberwell Old Cemetery did not have the grandeur of nearby Nunhead Cemetery, which was one of the original London necropoleis, and once nearing capacity it was replaced by Camberwell New Cemetery on Brenchley Gardens.

Brenchley Gardens Park follows the route of the old line to the Crystal Palace culminating at the High Level station. The park runs behind Marmora Road and the remains of the embankment then continues along Wood Vale where flats were built on it. The line was closed in 1954 following a decline in its use after the destruction of the Crystal Palace in 1936 and due to slippage in the structure of the embankment.


In the 1930s George Scott Williamson and Innes Pearse opened the Pioneer Health Centre in Queens Road. They planned to conduct a large experiment into the effect of environment on health. ‘The Peckham Experiment’ recruited 950 families at one shilling (5p) a week. The members joined something like a modern sports club with facilities for physical exercise, games, workshops and socialising with no mandatory programme. The centre moved into a purpose built modernist building by the architect Sir Owen Williams in 1935.”

From Wikipedia:

“ “Entertaining Father Stone” is the second episode of Channel 4 sitcom Father Ted.
Arthur Mathews introduces this episode by stating that the idea for Father Stone came from a ‘friend’ of a friend who stayed with the friend for his holidays and used to cheat at golf. This person had the ability to dominate and ruin the atmosphere of a room.”

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