“Away to the window I flew like a flash,/Tore open the shutters and threw up the sash.”*

*from “A Visit from St. Nicholas”, by CLEMENT CLARKE MOORE.

(Britannica.com): “…first published anonymously in the Troy (New York) Sentinel on December 23, 1823…By his own account, Moore had written it for the enjoyment of his children for Christmas in 1822. After Moore’s Poems was published, the family of Henry Livingston, Jr.—a soldier, landowner, and poet who died in 1828—disputed Moore’s claim and argued that the poem was Livingston’s. No physical evidence survived to prove Livingston’s authorship, but, in the early 21st century, computer-aided analysis of the text indicated that “A Visit from St. Nicholas” shows more similarities to Livingston’s poetry than to Moore’s.”

Image: Ham House, Ham St, Ham, Richmond-upon-Thames, Surrey TW10.

From Online Etymology Dictionary:

sash (n.2)
framed part of a window, 1680s, sashes, mangled Englishing of French châssis “frame” of a window or door (see chassis). French word taken as a plural and -s trimmed off by 1704. Sash-weight attested from 1737.”

From Wikipedia:

“A sash window or hung sash window is made of one or more movable panels, or “sashes”. The individual sashes are traditionally paned windows, but can now contain an individual sheet (or sheets, in the case of double glazing) of glass.”

From ventrolla.co.uk:

“…The counter balance feature was believed to have been initially used for doors and this is supported by the documented evidence “Office of Works Account 1663”. It revealed that lines and weights were fitted to different doors in the buildings at Whitehall. It didn’t take long for this system to transfer over to include its use in sash windows. The documented evidence also reveals that Thomas Kinward, Master Joiner, made changes to the sash windows of the Queen’s private apartment, by installing pulleys and lines to the sash windows in 1669, at Whitehall, although no specific mention of any counter weights has been noted.

The sash windows that were installed to the property belonging to the Duke and Duchess of Lauderdale, Ham House in London, showed confirmation that the windows were in fact, counter balanced. This installation occurred in 1672, and it was again, Thomas Kinward and Christopher Wren that placed their signatures on the accounts.

There was never any claim made to the invention of the counter balance system and there is no record of it ever having been patented. In the early development of sash windows with weights, the windows were framed by solid oak and there was a groove that had been cut to accommodate the weights. The top sash would not open and was in a fixed position, and it was only the bottom sash that opened. A short time later, there was a new development called the boxed frame. This frame was sectioned and its purpose was to hide the weights and enable them to go past each other easily.

The Great Fire of London which started at the bakery of Thomas Farriner on Pudding Lane (now London EC3) in 1666 also played a surprising role in sash window design. Building regulations were drastically overhauled after the devastation in the hope of reducing the risk of fire and its rapid spread through the city.

One such regulation stipulated that timber window frames should be recessed behind the outside stone or brick facade, leading to the development of Georgian architecture.”

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/ham-house-and-garden

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