“Maybe, just once, someone will call me, ‘Sir,’ without adding, ‘You’re making a scene.'”*

*spoken by the cartoon character Homer Simpson.

From Wikipedia:

Albert Romolo Broccoli April 5, 1909 – June 27, 1996), nicknamed “Cubby”, was an American film producer who made more than 40 motion pictures throughout his career. Most of the films were made in the United Kingdom and often filmed at Pinewood Studios. Co-founder of Danjaq, LLC and Eon Productions, Broccoli is most notable as the producer of many of the James Bond films. He and Harry Saltzman saw the films develop from relatively low-budget origins to large-budget, high-grossing extravaganzas, and Broccoli’s heirs continue to produce new Bond films.

Broccoli was born in the borough of Queens, New York City, the younger of two children of immigrants from the Calabria region of Italy, Giovanni Broccoli and Kristina Vence. He acquired his nickname after his cousin, mobster Pat DiCicco, began calling him “Kabibble,” after a similarly-named cartoon character. This was eventually shortened to “Kubbie” and adopted by Broccoli as “Cubby.”

Broccoli is alleged to have been involved in an altercation with comedian and Three Stooges creator Ted Healy outside the Trocadero nightclub, just before the latter’s death in 1937.

In recognition of Broccoli’s insistence that every James Bond film produced by EON should bear the name of the character’s creator, Ian Fleming, in the opening credits (even when the film contained no real connection to any Fleming novel, apart from the titular character), it was decided by his surviving family that all subsequent Bond films should bear Broccoli’s name. Therefore, all Bond films since Tomorrow Never Dies have opened with the line “Albert R. Broccoli’s EON Productions presents”.”

From Wikipedia:

“ “Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?” is one of the best-known American songs of the Great Depression. Written by lyricist Yip Harburg and composer Jay Gorney, “Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?” was part of the 1932 musical revue Americana; the melody is based on a Russian-Jewish lullaby. The song tells the story of the universal everyman, whose honest work towards achieving the American dream has been foiled by the economic collapse. Unusually for a Broadway song, it was composed largely in a minor key, as befits the subject matter. The song became best known through recordings by Bing Crosby and Rudy Vallée that were released in late 1932. The song received positive reviews and was one of the most popular songs of 1932. As one of the few popular songs during the era to discuss the darker aspects of the collapse, it came to be viewed as an anthem of the Great Depression.”

From the lyric:

“Say don’t you remember, they called me Al/It was Al all the time”

From Wikipedia:

” “You Can Call Me Al” is a song by American singer-songwriter Paul Simon. It was the lead single from his seventh studio album, Graceland (1986), released on Warner Bros. Records. Written by Simon, its lyrics follow an individual seemingly experiencing a midlife crisis. Its lyrics were partially inspired by Simon’s trip to South Africa and experience with its culture.
Released in September 1986, “You Can Call Me Al” became one of Simon’s biggest solo hits, reaching the top five in seven countries.

The names in the song came from an incident at a party that Simon went to with his then-wife Peggy Harper. French composer and conductor Pierre Boulez, who was attending the same party, mistakenly referred to Paul as “Al” and to Peggy as “Betty”, inspiring Simon to write a song.

The lyrics can be interpreted as describing a man experiencing a midlife crisis (“Where’s my wife and family? What if I die here? Who’ll be my role model?”). However, as Paul Simon himself explained during the Graceland episode of the Classic Albums documentary series, by the third verse the lyrics move from a generic portrait-like perspective to a personal and autobiographical one, as he describes his journey to South Africa which inspired the entire album.”

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